Embarrassing CV Mistakes To Avoid

Embarrassing CV Mistakes To Avoid

When it comes to job application, especially with the current labour market realities, the smallest mistakes are often the ones that cost you the job.

And if the mistakes go beyond just simple typos to include some embarrassing blunders, the recruiter is actually forced to wonder if the applicant really wants the job. It actually can be hilariously embarrassing when reviewing such resumes.

 This article is to remind jobseekers to actually take the time to proofread their CVs before sending out. Don’t take it for granted that the typist (the business centre operator you used) will check everything for you.

Below are some embarrassing mistakes that usually appear in CVs:

Wrong Spelling of Names
Check the spelling of your name before submitting that CV. Imagine spelling some known English names wrongly, like these:
(a)    Ezekel ... instead of Ezekiel
(b)   Samule ... instead of Samuel
(c)    Andew ... instead of Andrew
(d)   Piece ... instead of Peace
(e)   Jennifa ... instead of Jennifer

Such silly mistake will make you look unserious and land your CV in the trash can.

Wrong Email Address
Just imagine sending email to an applicant’s email address (correctly spelt as listed on CV), only for it to bounce back, or you receive response from an unknown person asking why you sent him the mail. Check your email carefully.

Casual and Informal Email Address
Avoid casual email addresses like: sexyluck@...com, sharpshooter@....com, da_ladysman@...com, etc. Use professional email address in your CV. You can use some variations of your first and last name to look professional, e.g. samueldavid16@....com.

Wrong Gender
This one is actually silly. You are a guy, but your sex is shown as “Female” (and vice versa). Probably, the typist just copied and pasted information from an earlier CV belonging to a lady, and forgot to edit the gender field. Next time, be watchful and read carefully.

Wrong Phone Number
Either one digit is missing from the GSM number you supplied (10 digits instead of 11) or it belongs to someone else.

Using Big English Words to Impress
No recruiter will consider you based on your usage of big English words or jargons. It’s even worse when such words are used completely out of context. Use simple terms to express yourself. The hirer wants to know you, simple.

Too long
From experience, I will advise you keep your resume between 1 to 2 pages. Include only relevant information and job history. Show your past accomplishments. Avoid stretching your CV to 5 pages, or even preparing a spiral-bounded multiple-page CV, up to 10 or even more. It’s actually hilarious. Except you’re applying to some specialist consultancy or teaching position where such document may be required.

Copying from other CVs Sent to Same Company
This one happens always. You pick a CV to review and suddenly you realize you’ve read it before. On a closer look, you discover there are two or more CVs like just it with same words, same formatting, same language, everything the same; the difference is just the applicant name.

To avoid the above mistakes, be sure to read through your application and CV before sending. Preferably, proofread a printed paper copy, not the softcopy on computer.

Thank you.

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